CARE FOR CURLY, KINKY, AFRO, WAVY & DRY HAIR – Curly Girl Method

CARING FOR DRY, CURLY, KINKY, WAVY. HIGHLY TEXTURED, COARSE AND FRIZZY HAIR – ARE YOU A CURLY GIRL METHOD FOLLOWER YET?

 

A lot of people with naturally curly, kinky, or wavy hair have turned to the ‘Curly Girl Method’ by Lorraine Massey, for caring for their hair, and they have had astoundingly great results with this. Others like myself have done better with a modified version of this method.

I think in the main you can use the theory and guidelines of the CG (Curly Girl) method as a template or guide and play around with it till you find what works for your hair remember everyone’s hair is different and will react differently to certain techniques, products and environments.

In fact to really see whether a regimen is working for you, you would need to do it quite a few times to judge. Personally I give a regimen about 3 – 4 weeks before casting judgement on whether it works for me, – unless the results are so horrendous on first use, in which case I stop immediately. But again even in this, it is different for each individual.

Let me break down the Curly Girl Method, as I understand it, to give you a snap shot of what it entails. Then I will give a breakdown of the routine I use that works for me.

  • To start the CG Method, you will need to Clarify your hair by washing with a shampoo that contains Sulphate[s], one last time, to rid your hair of any product build up, generally believed to be caused as a result of silicones – these are ingredients ending in ‘cone’, and ‘xane’, that are used in some hair products and are not water soluble.
  • Have your hair trimmed or as in my case cut, to get rid of any damaged hair or split ends. I think this step is optional, to begin with, but you will eventually have to cut off the damaged hair, when your new growth grows longer and you can see the difference in textures and health, between your new growth and old damaged hair.

(Remember, with time, even with careful and good maintenance of your hair, you still need to trim you ends to get rid of weathered ends that can result in knots and split ends which will develop regardless over time.) 

  • Replace your brushes with a wide toothed seamless comb. Wet or dry it is easier to damage curly hair with a brush. Untangling hair while bone dry with any tool is not a good idea; it just causes more static and therefore frizz. Instead switch to a wide-toothed comb, or better yet, use your fingers, (when the hair is wet). Using your fingers to untangle curly hair helps to bring out the curls much better. If it is difficult to untangle your hair this way, add more conditioner to your hair when wet or trim any unruly ends.
  • Stop Shampooing your hair – Majority of shampoos contain harsh, drying sulfates that strip the hair of its natural oils and defences. This extremely damaging for dry, wavy, kinky or curly hair. Examples of sulphates are; Ammonium Laureth Sulfate, Ammonium Lauryl Sulfate, Sodium Laureth Sulfate, etc. These common detergents found in shampoos make dry, wavy, kinky and curly hair frizzy and uncooperative. Conditioner can be used sufficiently to clean the hair . Also, more gentle Sulfate Free Shampoos that contain mild cleansers, such as; Cocamidopropyl Betaine or Coco Betaine, can be used occasionally or more often for wavier hair types. 

“You’d never dream of washing a good sweater with detergent. Yet most shampoos contain harsh detergents (sodium lauryl sulfate or laureth sulfate) that one finds in dish washing liquid. They’re great for pots and pans because they cut through grease so effectively. Your hair on the other hand, needs to retain some natural oils, which protect your hair and scalp. Stripping them away deprives the hair of necessary moisture and amino acids and makes it look dry and dull.” - Lorraine Massey

  • Wash your scalp with Silicon Free Conditioner (conditioner washing, or co-washing). Begin by wetting your hair in the shower. Distribute a dollop of conditioner on your entire scalp and massage with the tips of your fingers (do not use your fingernails). This rubbing action and the resultant friction will loosen dirt, product residue, and dandruff which can then be rinsed away. Thoroughly rinse your scalp afterwards, still massaging with your fingertips as you do so.  Depending on how dry your scalp is, you can conditioner wash, once a week, twice a week, or every day. Be mindful of hair build up though if you are co-washing more than once a week.

“The curly-haired can leave their hair hydrated with natural oils and clean their scalps quite well by rinsing only with hair conditioner once a week or less. Rubbing the scalp firmly with fingers is enough to loosen dirt.” – Lorraine Massey

  • Condition with a rich moisturising silicone free conditioner, distribute this throughout your hair and untangle gently. Use your hands or a wide-toothed comb.
  • Do the final rinse of your hair with cool or cold water. This will decrease frizz and add shine. Leave some conditioner in your hair, especially in dry sections like the ends. It’s fine to run your fingers through your hair gently, but do not comb your hair after this point.
  •  Apply products to your hair. Do this while your hair is soaking wet if you have curlier hair, but wait five minutes or so if you have medium to wavy curly hair. Put product in your hands and rub them together to emulsify. Then, section your hair and smooth or rake the product into each section. You can begin with a leave-in cream or conditioner to decrease frizz and then follow with a gel for hold and definition. Finger shape the curls by scrunching them (cup your hair in the palms of your hands and scrunch in an upward motion) and/or twisting individual curls around a finger.
  • Gently scrunch your hair with a cotton t-shirt, paper towels, or a micro-fibre towel to remove excess moisture. A generic terrycloth towel will make your hair frizzy. You may wish to finger shape your curls at this time instead. Next, wait five or so minutes so the hair can permanently assume its current shape.
  • Plopping your hair in a t-shirt or micro fibre towel will decrease the drying time of your hair. Tie up your hair turban style in the t-shirt or micro-fibre towel and leave for 15-30 minutes remove the cloth. If your hair is frizzy after plopping lightly graze the hair with gel. Plopping works best for medium to long length curly hair. 
  •  Air drying your hair is the easiest and gentlest way to dry your hair. If you must blow dry your hair, use a diffuser (to avoid frizz), on a warm not hot setting. Dry with hair dryer till hair is partially dry (about 80%) and then leave to air-dry. Do not touch your hair while it is drying or it will mess up and frizz.
  1. -       A bowl diffuser with fingers causes more volume and clumping (curls sticking together instead of going every which way).
  2. -       A sock diffuser is lightweight, fits on any hair dryer, and is portable.  Aim the diffuser at different parts of your hair while you scrunch your hair with your hands. Stop scrunching when your hair is about 50% dry.
  • Find an experienced hairstylist, who is experienced in cutting and maintaining curly hair. Ask him/her in advance what products they are going to use on your hair. Unplanned haircuts can be disastrous for curly hair. If their products contain silicones insist on bringing your own. If your hairstylist uses a razor to thin out your hair it will make your ends ratty and prone to split ends.
  • Have your hair trimmed every four to six months. A 1/2-inch or 1/4-inch trim is usually enough to get rid of split ends.
  • Long, rounded layers are more suited to curly hair–short layers tend to stick up and look funny.
  • Have your hair trimmed or cut when dry. Curly hair usually consists of a combination of textures, it is therefore hard to tell how much shrinkage different parts of your hair will have or how the curl will eventually look like when the hair is wet. Keep in mind that curly hair is much shorter when dry than wet. You may lose only two inches while wet, but that could be four or five while dry!
  • Give your hair time to adjust. It takes 2 to 6 weeks for your hair to adjust to the no shampoo and it may even look worse at first. Hair is a long-term project and it may take a couple weeks for it to regain its health after being stripped of moisture for years by shampoo.

This method as I previously mentioned has been adopted by most naturally curly people, even those who have chemically relaxed or altered hair. This method works very well for people with dry, brittle, damaged or colour treated hair.

If you want to read up more on this method, the theory and science behind it, you can buy the book from the Amazon link below

http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=curly+girl+lorraine+massey&tag=googhydr-21&index=aps&hvadid=5170551976&ref=pd_sl_9qkt7bgcnh_b

SOME TIPS TO REMEMBER!:

  1. Many curly, wavy or kinky textured hair types, decide to be modified CG and follow the guidelines loosely, as and how it suits them, for example, using light silicones, straightening hair with a flat iron, clarifying with a sulfate free shampoo, etc, because it works for them.
  2. Different products work better for different types of curly hair. You will want to experiment and check out different hair products and research feedback by joining blogs sites like this one and hair forums like http://www.britishcurlies.co.uk/curl_forum/ for products that work for your hair type. Some good high quality lines of products for curly hair are: Komaza Care, Curl Junkie, Kinky Curly, and Devacurl (created in part by Lorraine Massey).
  3. Curly hair has different needs during different seasons. In the summer use more liquid-like products so as to not suffocate the hair. It’s also helpful to leave less conditioner or leave-in cream in your hair to prevent frizzing and increase definition. It’s sort of the opposite in winter. You should use heavier, creamier products and more conditioner or leave-in to combat dry, wintry air.

 

c2k. x

 

 

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